21.3 Rear Seats & Gaiters

Rear Seat

The optional rear “seat” is actually just a shelf as it cannot have 3-point belts and it would be too small for anyone but the smallest children. However, cosmetically it looks really good (photo 1). I wanted to make it easily removable so that I can use the space when touring or perhaps eventually make an alternative removable luggage box.

The seat has two parts, the back and the cushion (or squab). It is supplied with hinges which fix the seat back to the flat shelf area above the rear axle. The squab is normally screwed in from underneath. I chose to modify the seat fixings to make both parts removable.

  1. The base of each hinge was modified by making keyhole slots (photo 2). Small pillars were fitted to the rear shelf for these keyhole slots to engage with.

  2. A further hole was drilled to accept a peg to prevent the hinge sliding out of engagement (photo 3).

  3. The squab was fixed front and rear with webbing straps screwed to its underside and press studs (photo 4).

  4. The top of the seat back was held by the use of two more webbing straps and press studs (photo 5).

Handbrake & Gear Lever Gaiters

Gaiters were supplied for the handbrake and gear lever in matching vinyl.

Handbrake Gaiter

I found it necessary for an extra section of spare vinyl to be let into the front of the supplied gaiter (with thanks to my mother and her sewing machine!) in order to clear the handbrake switch. I used press studs to secure the gaiter to the transmission tunnel rather than have it sewn to the carpet (photo 6).

Gear Lever Gaiter

I decided to use a standard MGB rubber gaiter under the vinyl one to reduce noise and provide protection from the elements. Both gaiters are held securely under the standard MGB chrome ring (photo 7). This does, however, make the gaiter look a little bulky and hampers selection of gears, particularly reverse. Later I made the rubber gaiter smaller by cutting away the bottom section which improves both the look and the gear selection.